Gate of Life Course Lesson 4 – Jing

Rehmannia discusses the first Treasure, Jing; the accumulation of physical life, its capacity to thrive, the repository of its integrity and its reproductive potential. He looks at this foundational energy reserve, how it is used and replenished. He theorizes that Jing is comprised of four generations of genetic expression.

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Audio Course Lesson 4 – Introduction:

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Audio Course Lesson 4:

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Gate of Life Course Lesson 4 – Jing:

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2 thoughts on “Gate of Life Course Lesson 4 – Jing

  1. Rehmannia,

    Is there any difference in efficacy of and application based on methods of using and preparing herbs? In Healing Thresholds you mention hot water decoction (concentrated powder or whole herb), alcohol decoction (chu), making syrups, and adding herbs in food (jook). As a tonic herbalist, when would you recommend a specific way in which herbs would be taken in hot water as a concentrated powder? in hot water as a whole herb? as chu? as a syrup? or in food?

    Thanks,
    Dave

    • Hi Dave. Thanks for the query man. Its really your choice and your creativity. The Chinese masters believe hot water decoctions as tea are most effective, but “Chiew’s” of herbs decanted in alcohol are very therapeutic when done right. Jooks are a traditional housewive’s medicinal approach to family herbal supplementation- they cook the herbs including goji, cordyceps, longan, and more into rice soups. My feeling is that powdered extracts of herbs have lost some of their essence.

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